Business of the Creative Industries Environment

You are asked to examine and critique different types of changing environments that pertain to creative practice.

 

Assessment  is intended to support individual idea development and the building of students’ own line of arguments. It is intended to be more of a think piece about what the student thinks about broad conceptual and policy issues. The format of the piece is less formal; a short report, which engages with key reading and ideas (no table of contents required). It is a short piece and students should not attempt to do too much – make just 1 or 2 arguments and make the arguments convincingly.

Through assignment 2, students will:

  1. The role of digital platforms as cultural intermediaries
  2. Barriers to entry to the creative industries
  3. Exploiting micro dynamics of innovation in co-working spaces

 

Complete a 1,000 word report. This is worth 10% of the module mark.

Complete a 1,000 word report on one of the following topics discussed in class:

Assessment 2 is intended to support individual idea development and the building of students’ own line of arguments. It is intended to be more of a think piece about what the student thinks about broad conceptual and policy issues. The format of the piece is less formal; a short report, which engages with key reading and ideas (no table of contents required). It is a short piece and students should not attempt to do too much – make just 1 or 2 arguments and make the arguments convincingly.

Through assignment 2, students will:

  1. The role of digital platforms as cultural intermediaries
  2. Barriers to entry to the creative industries
  3. Exploiting micro dynamics of innovation in co-working spaces
  4. The role of creative commons licences in the creative industries

-12-

LCBS5048 Business of the Creative Industries Environment

  1. Demonstrateacomprehensiveunderstandingofthecreativeindustriesandtheirroleinthecreative economy (25%).
  2. Applyknowledgebyanalysingconceptualideasandcreatingnewconceptsandsolutionsforareallife scenario (50%).
  3. Communicateresearchfindingsandconclusionseffectivelytosupportcogencyofargumentandto demonstrate academic engagement (25%).

 

 

 

 

 

Resources

 

Cultural intermediaries:

Bourdieu, P. (1984) Distinction: A social critique of the judgment of taste. Routledge
De Propis, L. and Mwaura, S. (2013) Demystifying Cultural Intermediaries: Who are they, what do they do and where can they be found in England?
Durrer. V. and Miles, S. (2009) New Perspectives on the Role of Cultural Intermediaries in Social Inclusion in the UK, in Consumption, Markets and Culture 12(3), pp225-241
Maquire, J.S. and Matthews, J. (2012) Are We All Cultural Intermediaries Now? An introduction to cultural intermediaries in context.
Scott, M. (2012) Cultural Entrepreneurs, Entrepreneurship: Music producers, mobilising and converting Bourdieu’s alternative capitals, in Poetics 40(3), pp237- 255
Webster, J., Gibbins, N., Halford, S. and Hracs, B.J. (2016) Towards a Theoretical Approach for Analysing Music Recommender Systems as Sociotechnical Cultural Intermediaries, in Proceedings of the 8th ACM Conference on Web Science, pp137- 145

Assessment 2
Mon 3rd Feb (PM) Precarious Work and Challenging Environments:

De Peuter, G. (2011) Creative Economy and Labor Precarity: A contested convergence, in Journal of Communication Inquiry 35(4), pp417-425
Mayer, V. (2014) Creative Work is Still Work, in Creative Industries Journal 7(1), pp59-61

McRobbie, A. (2002) Clubs to Companies: Notes on the decline of political culture in speeded up creative worlds, in Cultural Studies 16(4), pp516-531
Morgan, G. and Nelligan, P. (2015) Labile labour-gender, Flexibility and Creative Work, in The Sociological Review 63(1-Suppl), pp66-83

Morgan, G., Wood, J. and Nelligan, P. (2013)_ Beyond the Vocational Fragments: Creative work precarious labour and the idea of ‘flexploitation’, in the Economic and Labour Relations Review, 24(3), pp397-415

Assessment 2

-9-

LCBS5048

Business of the Creative Industries Environment

Tues 4th Feb Spaces of Access: accessing support for creative enterprises and workers. Bouncken, R.B. and Reuschl, A.J. (2018) Coworking-spaces: how a phenomenon of the sharing economy builds a novel trend for the workplace and for entrepreneurship’, in Review of Managerial Science 12(1), pp317-334
Capdevila, I. (2015) Co-working Spaces and the Localised Dynamics of Innovation in Barcelona, in International Journal of Innovation Management 19(3), pp154 Gandini, A. (2015) The Rise of the Coworking Spaces: A literature review, in Ephemera 15(1), p193
Montgomery, J. (2007) Creative Industry Business Incubators and Managed workspaces: A review of best practice, in Planning, Practice and Research, 22(4),
Assessment 2

Thurs 6th None Feb

Assessment 2

pp601-617

Thurs 6th Feb Digital Environments: intellectual property in the digital age.

Guibault, L.M. (2006) The Future of the Public Domain: identifying the commons in information law (vol 16). Kluwer Law International BV.
Flew, T. (2005) Creative Commons and the Creative Industries. Media and Arts Law Review 10(4), pp257-264

Aichroth, P. and Hasselbach, J., 2003. Incentive management for virtual goods: About
copyright and creative production in the digital domain. Virtual Goods 2003, pp.70-81.

Montgomery, L. and Fitzgerald, B., 2006. Copyright and the creative industries in

 

 
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Introduction to Work and Organisations Module code: LIPC1170

 

 

 

LIPC Leicester International Pathway College

Programme title:     IFY, BAL

Module Title:            Introduction to Work and Organisations

Module code:          LIPC1170

Owning Board:       Joint Academic Board (DMU/OIEG)

Faculty:                     University Wide Learning (DMU)

Term/semester:      Spring Term, 2020

Module Leader:       Fiona Lloyd

Module tutors:         Iwona Johnson, Epi …, Tim Collins

Email address:        Fiona.lloyd@dmu.ac.uk

Assignment 1:       Course work, Individual Essay

Weighting –               40%

Word count:             1,500 words, (guidance)

Handout date:      Monday 3rd February, 2020, and available on Blackboard in the Assessment folder from 9.00am

Submission date:      Wednesday 19th February, by 09.00am, via turnitin

 

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Demonstrate an understanding of the basic principles and theories of organisational behaviour
  2. Explain the principles of management built into organisational structures and the design of work in the 21st Century
  3. Demonstrate an awareness of current issues relating to managing organisations

 

The essay must contain clear evidence of research.  Therefore, you will need to link your discussion to a variety of academic and factual sources of information such as recent publications (journals, books) and news.

 

 

 

Case study

Caduceus is a Limited liability organisation operating in the care industry in the heart of the UK, and serving the interests of a wide range of stakeholders.  These groups include individuals requiring full time care, individuals who wish to live independently in a sheltered living environment with a range of support services included, the NHS and local government services for health and welfare to the wider community.  With several units of operation in Northamptonshire, Leicestershire and Nottinghamshire, totalling 11 facilities in all, they offer services in a central regional position in the UK.

Caduceus has recently acquired Barhampton View, a care facility in Northampton, with one section providing independent living apartments through ownership to 40 clients, and another section on the same site of a fully supported care unit to meet the needs of 40 vulnerable adults all needing individual care and attention.

Services provided to full care residents at Barhampton are funded by the NHS, or private personal funds or family financial contributions. The independent living community own their own homes, pay normal Council Tax on each residential property and a set additional amount of maintenance fees added for the provision of services and facilities such as cleaners, a residents’ lounge, cinema room, lifts and grounds’ maintenance.

The acquisition of Barhampton by Caduceus has naturally raised concerns amongst staff in both areas of the Barhampton complex, as well as caused a level of instability at regional level in those employees who work for Caduceus.

Due to rising costs for staffing and a reduction in income from the NHS funded residents Caduceus is now considering offering the contract for cleaning, maintaining facilities and the estate in general to an organisation in the private sector and the process of placing tenders for the contract will begin in June 2020.  However, prior to any decision being made the CEO and Senior Managers of Caduceus  have invited a range of stakeholders including all employees at both local and regional level to join in a period of consultation based on improving productivity and efficiency in-house before offering the task to an outsourced private sector provider.  All staff are invited to join and participate in an Employee Forum discussion group.  Ideas for restructuring the organisation and the workforce to provide a better, more economical and efficient service from all individuals and teams participating in the employee forum will be given consideration as a priority over any tender from external organisations.

One team from the Leicester area has put forward some simple proposals for labour efficiency that they estimate will be able to reduce the workforce of the entire company by 20%, (and the associated wages and salary bill), but at the same time retain 80% of the current jobs and so limit the impact of job losses at local and regional level.

 

 

 

 

 

Tasks and questions

 

  1. Identify the management style being used by the CEO of Caduceus and explain why in the current operational climate for health sector organisations you think it may, or may not, be appropriate. In your answer you should make reference to a range of relevant theories on management and leadership styles, advantages and disadvantages of styles with regard to the scenario.
  2. Analyse the impact of the proposed change(s) on the motivation of the Care Services workforce. In your answer, you should make reference to a range of relevant theories of motivation, addressing their strengths and weaknesses which must be applied to the given scenario.

 

  1. Evaluate the impact of the consultation period on those participating in the employee forum. Again, use suitable theory to outline the possible benefits to those involved and evaluate them for both the short, medium and long term, making reference to possible changes in overall organisational structure resulting from the acquisition of the Barhampton complex.

 

 

 

Criteria Proposed marking structure  Marks
Research:

Evidence of research

Good quality sources

 

Required range of sources

ü  Student has undertaken some research, and at least two academic sources (up to 6 marks)

ü  Student has undertaken research that covers a range of sources including at least one book, one webpage and one other that is appropriate to the task (up to 11 marks)

ü  Student has undertaken thorough research that covers a wide range of resources as above in addition to a journal or further academic source (up to 17 marks)

ü  Student has undertaken extensive research that covers a wide range of resources as above in addition to further current academic sources in the public domain. (up to 25 marks)

25
Analytical Approach:

Arguments are justified through use of supporting evidence

Evidence is analysed

ü  Basic descriptive discussion with little analysis, that begins to answer the question(s) (up to 9 marks)

ü  Further developed discussion with analysis, using supportive statements and theories that answer the task set (up to 17 marks)

ü  Considerable discussion with analysis and evidence to support task answer above with application of relevant theoretical models (up to 23 marks)

ü  Excellent discussion with strong analysis, using a range of theoretical models and supportive evidence and which draws conclusions, evidenced with a high level of research including various sources (as detailed above. (up to 30 marks)

30
Student Voice:

Use of own words and style of writing; use of quotations is not excessive

Critical approach: stands of evidence are compared, contrasted and questioned

ü  Own interpretation, own style developed, discussion evidence (some critical analysis within discussion can be drawn out of the evidence within the answers) up to 15 marks

ü  As above, with developing critical analysis, used to draw together and create contrast and comparison elements (up to 20 marks)

ü  As above, with excellent critique throughout, to draw strong conclusions that make sound discussion allowing an analytical and evaluative critique (up to 25 marks)

25
Structure:

Essay Format

 

There is a sequential logic and clear structure to the assignment

ü  Adequate structure that has a basic element of a beginning, middle and conclusive end (up to 5 marks)

ü  Developed structure with a conclusive argument woven and followed through that creates an appropriate justified conclusion (up to 7 marks)

ü  Excellent structure with an argument drawn from the structure of the essay throughout with a final strong conclusion that is valid, relevant and appropriate to the arguments made throughout the assignment (up to 10 marks)

10
Referencing:

Correct use of Harvard conventions (in-text citations, reference list, cross-references)

 

ü  Harvard Referencing is evident, correct, alphabetised, and is appropriate (up to 5 marks)

 

5
General presentation:

Front cover

Spelling, punctuation and grammar

Correct use of paragraphing

Text formatting (line spacing, font size, word count, fully justified text)

ü  Spelling, punctuation, grammar, appropriate use of paragraphs and a cohesive layout, which includes a front cover and a contents page, as well as page numbers as a footer (up to 5 marks)

 

ü  Text formatting (Arial 11, double line spacing)

5
TOTAL:   100

 

 

 

 

 
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Global Business Issues Module code:          LIPC1160

 

                       

 

DMU International College

Programme:             International First Year (IFY) BAL

Module Title:            Global Business Issues

Module code:          LIPC1160

Owning Board:       Joint Academic Board (DMU/OIEG)

Faculty:                     University Wide Learning (DMU)

Term/semester:      Term 2, April 2020

Module Tutor:         Mr Mille Dias, Donovan Anderson‎, Chirag Dattani

Email address:        mille.dias@dmu.ac.uk;    donovan.anderson@dmu.ac.uk; chirag.dattani@dmu.ac.uk;

Assignment 2:       Essay (Written Report)

Weighting:              20%

Word count:           1,000 words (guidance)

Submission date:     Friday 24th April, 2020 by 9am via Turnitin

 

 

Learning Outcomes:

LO2 Utilise fundamental theories and principles in order to measure and analyse key business issues

 

LO3 Show an understanding of the inter-relationship between economic variables and issues within both a domestic and an international context

 

 

 

Bad Academic Practice

A major expectation of all assessments whilst at DMU/DMUIC is that students work in the English language and generate their assignments in the English language.   Initial work should be produced in English not a second language. This means that the use of any language generation/translation or websites is discouraged. The use of such tools may be considered Bad Academic Practice and the consequences outlined in the module handbook will apply.

 

 

 

INDIVIDUAL ESSAY

Introduction

Increased globalisation in the 21st century has been demonstrated by alliances between countries, the emergence of new trading blocs, mergers, acquisitions and takeovers, sometimes joining most unlikely business partners.

 

 

TASK

You are asked to produce an essay to analyse the potential impact of the very recent acquisition of Costa Coffee by the global soft drinks manufacturer Coca Cola.

 

As appendices you should provide a PESTLE model to analyse a range of impacting factors for Coca Cola with regard to this venture, and a Porter’s Five Forces Model analysing key points, and both focussing on the global perspective.  Other models might include a SWOT analysis, Ansoff matrix, Boston Matrix.

 

The essay must contain clear evidence of research; therefore, you will need to link your discussion to a variety of academic and factual sources of information such as recent publications (journals, books), news articles and media coverage of the acquisition.

 

 

Criteria Proposed marking structure Max Mark
Research:

Evidence of research

Good quality sources

 

 

 

 

 

Required range of sources

ü  Student has undertaken some research, and at least two academic sources (up to 10 marks)

ü  Student has undertaken research that covers a range of sources including at least one book, one webpage and one that is appropriate to the task (up to 15 marks)

ü  Student has undertaken wider reading and  research that covers a wide range of resources as above in addition a journal or further academic source (up to 20 marks)

ü  Student has undertaken extensive research that covers a wide range of current and up to date resources as above in addition to journals or further academic reading (up to 25 marks)

ü

25
Analytical Approach:

Arguments are justified through use of supporting evidence

 

 

 

 

 

 

Evidence is analysed

ü  Basic discussion with some analysis, using either of the models that begins to justify the arguments made (up to 9 marks)

ü  Some developed discussion with analysis, using both models and supportive statements that answer the task set (up to 16 marks)

ü  Further developed discussion with analysis, effectively developing the use of several models and supportive statements that answer the task set (up to 23 marks)

ü  Considerable discussion with analysis and evidence to support task answer above (up to 30 marks)

ü  Excellent discussion with strong analysis, using a range of models, other supportive evidence, conclusions drawn and evidenced at a high level of research including various sources (as above research section) (up to 35 marks)

35
Student Voice:

Use of own words and style of writing; use of quotations is not excessive

 

 

 

 

Critical approach: stands of evidence are compared, contrasted and questioned

ü  Own interpretation, own style developed, discussion evidence (some critical analysis within discussion can be drawn out of the evidence within the answers) up to 7 marks

ü  As above, with developing critical analysis, used to draw together and create contrast and comparison elements (up to 13 marks)

ü  As above, with excellent critique throughout, to draw strong conclusions that make sound discussion allowing a contrasting and comparative critique (up to 20 marks)

20
Structure:

Essay Format

 

There is a sequential logic and clear structure to the assignment

ü  Adequate structure that has a basic element of a beginning, middle and conclusive end (up to 4 marks)

ü  Developed structure with a conclusive argument woven and followed through that creates an appropriate conclusion (up to 7 marks)

ü  Excellent structure with an argument drawn from the threads of the structure of the essay throughout with a final conclusion that is valid, relevant and appropriate to the arguments made throughout the assignment (up to 10 marks)

10
Referencing:

Correct use of Harvard conventions (in-text citations, reference list, cross-references)

 

ü  Harvard Referencing is evident, mostly correct and is appropriate (up to 3 marks)

ü  Excellent use of Harvard Referencing system which is alphabetised and correct (up to 5 marks)

5
General presentation:

Front cover

Spelling, punctuation and grammar

Correct use of paragraphing

Text formatting (line spacing, font size, word count, fully justified text)

ü  Spelling, punctuation, grammar, appropriate use of paragraphs and a cohesive layout, which includes a front cover and a content page (up to 5 marks)

 

ü  Text formatting (Arial 11, double line spacing spacing) and use of page numbers.

5
TOTAL:   100

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
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Business of the Creative Industries Environment

Business of the Creative Industries Environment

Individual Essay 3,000 words

Assessment Notes the case studies of creative spaces are used alongside the theoretical and policy models of creativity and innovation, to outline a suitable ‘environment’ for creative practitioners to operate in

Module Resources

Introduction and Innovation Models:

1.NESTA (2018) Creative Nation https://www.nesta.org.uk/report/creative-nation/ O’Connor, J. (2016) The Cultural and Creative Industries: a literature review. ACE Potts, J. and Cunningham, S. (2010) Four Models of the Creative Industries. Brisbane: QUT

Storper, M. (2018) Keys to the City: How economics, institutions, social interaction, and politics shape development. Princeton University Press
Storper, M. (2016) The Rise and Fall of Urban Economies: Lessons from San Francisco and Los Angeles. Stanford

UK (2018) Industrial Strategy: Building a Britain for for the future. UK Government https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/a ttachment_data/file/664563/industrial-strategy-white-paper-web-ready- version.pdf

UK (2019) Government Technology Innovation Strategy, Cabinet Office

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/the-government-technology- innovation-strategy/the-government-technology-innovation-strategy

 

  1. Relational environments: The mobility of tacit and symbolic knowledge Social capital and the role of spatiality in knowledge transfer

Adler, P.S. (1996) The Dynamic Relationship between Tacit and Codified Knowledge: Comments on Ikujiro Nonaka’s “managing Innovation as an organisational Knowledge Creation process”, in Pogorel, G. and Allouche, J. (eds) International Handbook of Technology management. Amsterdam: North Holland Asheim, B. and Coenen, L. (2005) Regional Innovation System Policy: a knowledge- based approach, CIRCLE 2005/13. Lund University

Baragheh, A., Rowley, E. and Sambrook, S. (2009) Towards a Multi Disciplinary Definition of Innovation, in Management Decision 47(8), pp1323-1339
Cooke, P. (2004) The Role of Research in Regional Innovation Systems: new models meeting knowledge economy demands, in International Journal of Technology Management 28(3-6), pp507-532

Faulconbridge, J.R. (2017) Relational Geographies of Knowledge and Innovation, in Bathelt, H., Cohendet, P., Henn, S. and Simon, L. (eds) The Elgar Companion to Innovation and Knowledge Creation. Edward Elgar, pp671-684
Lundvall, B-A. (2005) national Innovation Systems – Analytical Concept and Development Tool, at DRUID Copenhagen, June 2005

 

  1. Creative Ecosystems: The creative city. Underground Spaces. Infrastructure in the city as a basis for creative enterprise

Dovey, J., Pratt, A.C., Virani, T., Merkel, J., Lansdowne, J. (2016) Creative Hubs: Understanding the New Economy. British Council and NESTA https://creativeconomy.britishcouncil.org/resources/creative-hubs- understanding-new-economy/

British Council (2015) Creative Hub Toolkit

https://creativeconomy.britishcouncil.org/blog/15/06/28/creative-hubkit-made- hubs-emerging-hubs/ (see also https://creativeconomy.britishcouncil.org/projects/hubs/, https://creativeconomy.britishcouncil.org/blog/19/07/10/creative-hubs-learn/) Evans, G. (2009) Creative Cities, Creative Spaces and Urban Policy, in Urban Studies 46(5-6), pp1003-1040

Grandadam, D., Cohendet, P. and Simon, L. (2012) Places, Spaces and the Dynamics of Creativity. The Video Game Industry in Montreal, in Regional Studies 47(10), pp1701-1714
Granger, R.C. (2018) The Sustainability of Creative Cities. De Montfort University

Scott, A. (2016) Creative Cities: Conceptual issues and Policy Questions, in Journal of Urban Affairs 28(1), pp1-17
Rodrigues-Pose, A. and Crescenzi, R. (2010) Research and Development, Spillovers, Innovation Systems, and the Genesis of Regional Growth in Europe, in Regional Studies 42(1), pp51-67

 

 

  1. Social Capital, Sticky Knowledge, professional networks:

Granger, R.C. and Bazaz, P. (2017) The Art of Disruption: The role of universities in the creative economy. De Montfort University
Markusen, A. (1996) Sticky Places in Slippery Space: A typology of industrial districts, in Journal of Economic Geography 72(3)

Storper, M. (2018) Keys to the City: How economics, institutions, social interaction, and politics shape development. Princeton University Press
Faulconbridge, J.R. (2017) Relational Geographies of Knowledge and Innovation, in Bathelt, H., Cohendet, P., Henn, S. and Simon, L. (eds) The Elgar Companion to Innovation and Knowledge Creation. Edward Elgar, pp671-684

Granovetter, M. (1973) The Strength of Weak Ties, American Journal of Sociology 78(6), pp1360-1380

 

  1. Open innovation, alternative spaces:

Cunningham, S. (2016) The Creative Cities Discourse: production and/or consumption? Brisbane: QUT
Soja, E.W. (1996/2006) Thirdspace: Journeys to Los Angeles and other Real-and- Imagined Places. Oxford: Blackwell
Bourdieu, P. (1972/1977) Outline of a Theory of Practice. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press

 

Demand:

Complete a 3,000 words essay, on the following. This assignment is worth 75% of the module mark.

Providing policy and case study material that supports your argument, what would be the most suitable business environment for creative practice? As part of your answer, please consider:

  1. (i)  What are the conditions needed for technological innovation? What is the environment

described in the UK Technology Strategy?

  1. (ii)  What is the optimal environment presupposed in a creative hub?

Assessment 1 is a formal essay, which combines the theory and conceptual ideas relating to innovation, relational economies, and social capital discussed in class and gained through the module’s reading, with the observations and critical thinking of Leicester as a creative case study. An essay that attempts to describe a creative ecosystem or describes the theories discussed in class or Leicester’s cultural/economic policies, but fails to apply this to the question, or to formulate an argument will not pass the assignment. The emphasis is on your ability to critique theories, apply these to real life case studies, and to build arguments. As such, assignment 1 tests your learning against the following learning outcomes:

  1. Demonstrateacomprehensiveunderstandingofthecreativeindustriesandtheirroleinthecreative economy (25%).
  2. Evaluatecriticallytheoreticalconcepts,analysingtherelationshipbetweencreativity,innovation,the macro-economy, and a locality (25%).
  3. Applyknowledgebyanalysingconceptualideasandcreatingnewconceptsandsolutionsforareallife scenario (25%).
  4. Communicateresearchfindingsandconclusionseffectivelytosupportcogencyofargumentandto demonstrate academic engagement (25%).

 

 

 

 

 
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Management of Innovation in the Creative Industries

Question Description

I’m studying for my Blog Post class and need an explanation.

 

1000words

Reflexive blog

Your blog should reflect on your developing understanding of creative business management theory and practice. It is an opportunity for you to record your thoughts and ideas about topics covered in workshops. The post should demonstrate your engagement with issues covered in workshops and in your reading.

You should aim to provide evidence of your engagement with additional relevant material drawing on the case studies presented in class as well as on cases from your own research (e.g. newspaper articles, websites, podcasts, texts you have read) and attempt to note down key ideas / concepts and track their development. You should also think about how you can support the ideas in our blog posts with pictures, relevant videos (e.g. maybe an interview with a creative worker) and charts. You should use the reflective journal to discuss in depth one of the topics covered in this module (total length of your blog should be 1000 words).

The blog may contain:

• Your reflections on the subject of the workshops.
• Your reflections on module key readings and other texts from the reading list.
• References to cultural and creative industry debates on the specific notion of innovation in newspapers and academic journals, and your observations on these debates and their relation to issues covered in the module.
• Your thoughts and feelings about workshop activities and discussions, etc.
• Your reflections on any observations or experiences that relates to your developing thoughts.

Remember to reference your sources using Harvard, but be creative, too! You can experiment by including links, images, film clips etc. in your posts.

 
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International Accounting and Finance

Question Description

I don’t know how to handle this Accounting question and need guidance.

 

Required:

You should write answers to each of a) b) and c) as three parts of the main body of a single report to the non-financial directors of BP plc, using the 2018 Annual Report as a resource (see copy of full report on Blackboard in the Assessment folder):

  • Analyse the 2018 BP financial statements in terms of performance, short term liquidity and working capital comparing the results with 2017 (see lectures 3 and 4 and Scott – Accounting for Business for the ratios that could be used) (Indicative 800 words maximum) (40% weighting).
  • Explain the meaning of corporate governance using BP’s 2018 corporate governance report in the annual report (pp57-111) to illustrate your answer. Discuss your opinion on the strength of BP’s system of corporate governance (Indicative 500 words maximum) (25%).
  • BP is financed from both equity and debt. Explain the meaning of equity and debt. Using the notes to the accounts 26 and 31 from the 2018 BP financial statements, explain the difference between fixed rate and floating rate debt and between ordinary shares and preference shares and discuss why BP is financed using all of these instruments (Indicative 500 words maximum) (25%).
 
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Global Business Issues:  LIPC1160

 

DMUIC

Module Title:            Global Business Issues

Module code:          LIPC1160

Owning Board:       Joint Academic Board (DMU/OIEG)

Faculty:                     University Wide Learning (DMU)

Term/semester:      Spring Term 1

Module Tutors:       Mille Dias, Epiphanie Verschuren, Chirag Dattani,

Email address:        mille.dias@dmu.ac.uk, epiphanie.verschuren@dmu.ac.uk  ,  chirag.dattani@dmu.ac.uk

 

Assignment 1:       Essay (Written Report)

Weighting –               30%

Word count:             1,500 words (guidance)

Submission date:     Friday 28th February, 2020 by 9am via Turnitin

Learning Outcomes:

LO1 Demonstrate an increased knowledge and understanding of current economic issues in the way in which they occur as well as assessing their implications

 

LO2 Utilise fundamental theories and principles in order to measure and analyse key business issues

 

LO3 Show an understanding of the inter-relationship between economic variables and issues within both a domestic and an international context

 

TASK

Write an essay that compares and contrasts the differences in organisational culture towards the concept of Corporate Social Responsibility demonstrated by organisations in the UK Drinks sector (Beverage sector).  The essay must link discussions to clear evidence of research, using a variety of academic and factual sources of information such as recent publications (journals, books) and news, which should all be referenced.  Guidance – 1,500 words excluding references, and where possible examples from the UK Drinks sector should be used.

 

 

 

Brand Overview: Drinks Sector – UK – May 2018

Social Responsibility

 

Innocent top scores for ethicality

More than half of consumers who have heard of Innocent consider it to be an ethical brand. A number of factors tie into this, not least its commitment to sustainability and the formation of the Innocent Foundation. As part of this, Innocent has pledged to donate 10% of profits to charity, creating an obvious way for consumers to judge the brand’s ethicality.

 

FIGURE 1: Top ranking of brands in the drinks sector, by agreement with “Ethical”, January 2015-January 2018

 

Base: internet users aged 16/18+ who have heard of the brand

 

  Brand Base Ethical
      %
1 Innocent 1,842 53
2 Clipper 1,208 45
3 Tropicana 1,939 44
4 Ribena 1,950 42
5 Kopparberg 1,465 (18+) 38
5 Vita Coco 906 38
5 BrewDog 822 (18+) 38
5 Fever-Tree 616 38
9 Kenco 1,826 37
10 Bottlegreen 680 36
10 Glacéau Smartwater 1,204 36
10 Pukka 1,009 36
10 Evian 1,907 36
  Average across drinks brands   27
  Average across all brands   28

 

Source: Lightspeed/Mintel

 

 

 

 

 

Kenco and Fever-Tree initiatives drive ethical image

While Mintel’s The Ethical Brand – UK, August 2017 Report suggests that brands displaying ethical behaviour across all of their operations tend to fare best in terms of driving a socially responsible image, brands can help their cause through prominent causes and initiatives.

 

For example, Kenco’s work with Coffee v Gangs ensures it has a particularly ethical image compared to the average drinks brand. While many coffee brands are either Fairtrade-accredited or support work in the local community, the way that Kenco has pushed this in marketing material over a sustained period appears to have helped to effectively filter its message through to consumers.

 

Similarly, Fever-Tree has a longstanding partnership with Malaria No More, a charity designed to end malaria, because of its sourcing of quinine for tonic waters in affected areas. In 2017, the brand pledged to give 20p from each gin and tonic consumed around the world on World Malaria Day, and has continued its partnership in 2018, donating £5 for each picture posted on social media with the hashtag #MalariaMustDie.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FIGURE 2: Fever-Tree #MalariaMustDie campaign, April 2018

 

Source: Fevertreemixers/Instagram/Mintel

 

Clipper focuses on the environment

Clipper has different ways that it highlights its care for the environment and the people who contribute towards the manufacturing of its products. Many of its products are certified Fairtrade or as organic by the Soil Association, which gives consumers an immediate indicator of its ethical proposition.

 

In addition, Clipper is the official tea of the National Trust, an organisation dedicated to the restoration and preservation of areas of natural beauty across the country. By teaming up with such an organisation, consumers are able to see a commitment to local environments as well as those where its tea is grown.

 

Mintel’s Brand Overview: Food – UK, March 2018 Report found that Dorset Cereals also benefited from a strong association with an environmental cause, through its link with the Woodland Trust.

 

FIGURE 3: Clipper tea as the official tea of the National Trust, March 2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source: Clipperteas/Instagram/Mintel

 

Plastic demonisation presents an opportunity

With the demonisation of plastic growing at pace, as discussed in Mintel’s 2018 Trend Sea Change, brands within the drinks category have an opportunity to further promote their ethicality.

 

Mintel’s Bottled Water – UK, March 2017 found that 29% of bottled water drinkers and buyers agree that drinking bottled water is bad for the environment. At the same time, 63% agreed that water in a bottle made from recycled plastic would appeal. Similarly, 48% say that a bottled water brand that guaranteed to offset its carbon footprint would encourage them to buy.

 

Evian has pledged to become carbon-neutral by 2020, and 100% circular by 2025, making all of its plastic bottles from 100% recycled plastic with zero plastic waste.

 

Glacéau Smartwater has already made moves towards making its bottles more environmentally friendly, with the launch of bottles carrying the Plant Bottle logo to identify that they are made with up to 30% plant materials. This type of bottle, created by Coca-Cola, has been described as the first ever fully recyclable PET (Polyethylene terephthalate) plastic bottle made partially from plants, creating a lighter carbon footprint.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Criteria Proposed marking structure Max Mark
Research:

Evidence of research

Good quality sources

 

 

 

 

 

Required range of sources

Student has undertaken some research, and at least two academic sources (up to 9 marks)

Student has undertaken research that covers a range of sources including at least one book, one webpage and one that is appropriate to the task (up to 13 marks)

Student has undertaken extensive research that covers a wide range of resources as above in addition a journal or further academic source (up to 20 marks)

20
Analytical Approach:

Arguments are justified through use of supporting evidence

 

 

 

 

 

Evidence is analysed

Basic discussion with some analysis,  that begins to justify the arguments made (up to 9 marks)

Further developed discussion with analysis, and supportive statements that answer the task set (up to 17 marks)

Considerable discussion with analysis, compare and contrast used effectively and evidence to support task answer above (up to 23 marks)

Excellent discussion with strong analysis,  supportive evidence and conclusions drawn and evidenced with considerable research including various sources (as above research section) (up to 30 marks)

30
Student Voice:

Use of own words and style of writing; use of quotations is not excessive

Critical approach: stands of evidence are compared, contrasted and questioned

Own interpretation, own style developed, discussion evidence (some critical analysis within discussion can be drawn out of the evidence within the answers) up to 15 marks

As above, with developing critical analysis, used to draw together and create contrast and comparison elements (up to 20 marks)

As above, with excellent critique throughout, to draw strong conclusions that make sound discussion allowing a contrasting and comparative critique (up to 25 marks)

25
Structure:

Essay Format

 

There is a sequential logic and clear structure to the assignment

Adequate structure that has a basic element of a beginning, middle and conclusive end (up to 6 marks)

Developed structure with a conclusive argument woven and followed through that creates an appropriate conclusion (up to 11 marks)

Excellent structure with an argument drawn from the threads of the structure of the essay throughout with a final conclusion that is valid, relevant and appropriate to the arguments made throughout the assignment (up to 15 marks)

15
Referencing:

Correct use of Harvard conventions (in-text citations, reference list, cross-references)

Harvard Referencing is evident, correct and is appropriate (up to 5 marks)

 

5
General presentation:

Front cover

Spelling, punctuation and grammar

Correct use of paragraphing

Text formatting (line spacing, font sixe, word count, fully justified text)

ü  Spelling, punctuation, grammar, appropriate use of paragraphs and a cohesive layout, which includes a front cover and a content page (up to 5 marks)

 

ü  Text formatting (Suggestion – Arial 11, double line spacing)

5
TOTAL:   100

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
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Principles of Marketing LIPC1140

DMUIC

 

 

 

 

Principles of Marketing

LIPC1140

 

 

 

Individual Assessment Guidelines

 

March- June 2020

 

 

Module Organiser: Dr Shelton Giwa

Tutors: Mr Paresh Lodhia

 

 

 

 

 

Learning Outcomes

 

On successful completion of the module, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the basic theoretical principles of marketing.

 

  1. Apply the theoretical knowledge gained to relevant business situations.

 

  1. Present effective marketing analysis in written formats.

 

A major expectation of all assessments whilst at DMU/DMUIC is that students work in the English language and generate their assignments in the English language.   Initial work should be produced in English not a second language. This means that the use of any language generation/translation or websites is discouraged. The use of such tools may be considered Bad Academic Practice and the consequences outlined in the previous section will apply.

 

  • Total assessment weighting 50%

Tasks

Choose a UK Operating Car/Automotive companies from the following list:-

 

 

Top Automotive Trends In 2019: A Year Of Wows And Woes

 

Sarwant SinghContributor

Transportation

 

Automotive Trends in 2019

Getty

It’s time for our annual exercise in trendspotting.

Last year we anticipated that global vehicle sales would be challenged and that was just what happened, with global passenger vehicle sales limping to a marginal increase of just over 400,000 units in 2018. We had all our chips on the unstoppable rise of mobility services and, by year end, the top 5 ride-hailing companies—Uber, Lyft, DiDi, Grab and Go-Jek—were estimated to be worth over $230 billion. We also predicted that value added services in automotive retail would be huge. So, on the one hand, software technology companies made further inroads into the automotive industry through services like usage-based insurance, new finance and leasing services, and connected car services while, on the other, automotive companies kept their customers engaged and satisfied through expanded and enhanced after sales services and solutions.

A Year Of Wows And Woes

This year, I believe, will be a combination of wows and woes. Automotive technologies will be fresh, exciting and innovative but the uncertainties caused by Brexit, the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA) and China taking its foot off the growth accelerator will threaten to throw a spoke in the wheel. We’re likely to see the fall of an automotive giant, the (near) extinction of a car segment that has long defined the popular vision of the automotive industry, a windfall for the titans of new mobility, and much, much more technology-driven disruption.

  • Internet of Things (IoT) And AI Unleash Transformation: IoT and AI technologies will continue to revolutionize the automotive sector, driving unprecedented transformations across vehicle and device connectivity, autonomous driving, electric powertrains, and shared mobility. Think of your vehicle becoming a mini-office with your in-vehicle personal digital assistant making the driving experience safer, more productive, and less fraught.
  • China Takes A Tumble: After a decade of sales growth, the Chinese automotive juggernaut finally stumbled, with the passenger vehicle market declining in 2018. Expect a slowing economy, the growing uptake of shared mobility modes, the continued popularity of public transportation, and an increasingly saturated SUV market to clip the wings of the Chinese dragon.
  • Ride-hailing IPOs Go Supersize: Expect some mega blockbuster ride-hailing IPOs in 2019. Among the big names set to hit the public market are Uber, Lyft and DiDi, with valuations beating those of well-established car companies who have been building cars for over 75 years.

PROMOTED

  • The Future Of Mobility Is Multimodal: Public private partnerships, reinforced by Big Data and data analytics, will power resource-efficient, flexible and on-demand multimodal mobility solutions. This will dovetail with new policy initiatives aimed at promoting streamlined and sustainable urban transportation. At the same time, expect more white label journey planning apps for B2B and travellers.
  • A Connected Environment With Features On Demand: A connected vehicle ecosystem is closer than we imagine. From powertrains and advanced driver assistance systems to connected services and smart interiors, cars are becoming more connected both internally and externally. Business models—ranging from freemium where connected features are offered either as a demo, charged one off or are subscription based to short and long term subscriptions with one time, monthly and yearly payment models—will evolve to keeping pace with this highly networked and connected environment. Just check out Audi’s new eTron launch strategy of offering an à lacarte menu of options where you can buy connected car features on demand.
  • The Vehicle As Marketplace: Bask in your own little (automotive) marketplace. From the comfort of your car, access a whole host of on-demand contextual services ranging from fuel and parking, food ordering and payments, restaurant reservations, hotel bookings, navigation, alerts on offers from your preferred dealership and information on connected brands and valuable offers.
  • Autonomous Shuttles And Taxis Zoom Closer To Reality: Forget all those sci fi films. The day is not far when you’ll be hopping into an autonomous shuttle or a self-flying taxi in the real world. Car manufacturers, mobility service providers and autonomous technology companies are furiously pushing to be the first to debut their vision of autonomous shared transportation.

But before that, watch out for the convergence of connected, autonomous, safety and electric technologies as they create three critical platforms—electric, digital, and electronic—that will form the building blocks for autonomous vehicle development. Amidst widespread change in vehicle systems and architecture, get ready for improved diagnostics and vehicle health monitoring, streamlined electrical power systems, redundant braking and steering systems, enhanced ease of use, better human machine interface (HMI) and infotainment features, superior cybersecurity modules and the growing redundancy of electronic control units (ECUs).

  • Electric Vehicles Are Charged And Ready To Go: More than 270 ambitious start-ups are revving up the electric vehicle (EV) industry. Stricter emissions regulations will be accompanied by a flurry of new model launches. Tesla better scramble because on the anvil are more than 43 confirmed model launches—25 battery EVs (BEVs) and 18 plug-in hybrid EVs (PHEVs)—in 2019. Gear up for electric mobility options to become more pervasive in ride-sharing and micro-mobility solutions. Global xEV sales are expected to grow 38% over 2018 to reach 6.67 million units.

Despite growth in EV and hybrid vehicles, don’t count out petrol powertrains just yet. Advances in petrol engine technology will further affect already beleaguered diesel powertrains but will facilitate the transition to alternative fuels.

And finally, charging technologies will make a quick dash to catch up with advances in EV technologies. While BEVs will move toward 350kW+ DC charging, PHEVs will start 50kW+ DC charging. As Combined Charging System (CCS+) technology becomes standard, fast charging EV charging stations will become as convenient to use as your local gas station.

  • Vehicle Subscription Services Are Here To Stay: Thanks to millennials and Gen Zers who are expected to emerge as their biggest customers, and the rising preference for access to, rather than ownership of, a vehicle, subscription services are ready to explode. Over 16.3 million new and used vehicles are expected to be part of the vehicle subscription universe by 2025.
  • Gen Zers Become The Key Influencers: As Gen Z comes into its own, OEMs will depart from conventional vehicle features, design and capabilities to embrace a new, Gen Z inflected idiom that meets their unique demands.

Automakers Scramble To Deal With Fallout Of Trade Deals

The automotive industry will need to brace for a rough ride in 2019. New vehicle sales in emerging markets like Thailand, Turkey and Slovakia are projected to decline slightly this year due to rising vehicle costs, and cannibalization by public transportation and new mobility alternatives. This will be offset by marginal growth in new car sales in other emerging markets such as India, Brazil and Mexico.

Overall, Latin America will be the savior on wheels, pushed principally by a resurgent Brazil. Strong GDP growth, solid sales, particularly in the SUV segment, and policy impetus through ‘Rota 2030’, a growth and modernization strategy targeting the country’s automotive sector, are set to make 2019 a standout year for the Brazilian automotive industry.

In less uplifting news, Brexit, USMCA and the US-China trade war will continue to cast dark shadows on the automotive industry. New vehicle production and sales are expected to experience setbacks. As the industry tries to ride out this difficult year, expect to see more alliances between automakers and attractive after sales offerings to lure consumers.

This article is based on research and analysis from a soon to be released Frost & Sullivan study: Global Automotive Outlook, 2019.

Source: Forbes (2019)

 

 

 

Assessment Details

 

Using the supporting materials provided (see also Mintel Report, 2020) Blackboard under Assessment), as guidance, and other reliable and academic sources complete the following: –

  1. A PRESTCOM analysis
  2. Evaluate the current marketing environment for your chosen retailer (E.g. Internet based vs. actual store sales, information from recent UK sales (current and future projections), footfall & consumer confidence.
  3. A SWOT analysis
  4. Analyse three factors from your PRESTCOM/SWOT analysis which, in your opinion, are the most significant. Make recommendations to the Marketing Director for future marketing plans.

 

Writing Guidelines

  • Text formatting: – Arial 12, double line spacing.
  • Word limit: – 2000 (+/- 10%) suggested.
  • Submission: – Via Turnitin (Blackboard)
  • Submission date: – Friday 5th May 2020 before 09.00 (week 6) via Turnitin

If you require an extension of the deadline for some assessment components for up to 14 days, please speak to the DMUIC Reception at least 24 hours before the assessment is due to take place.  You will be given a form to complete in order to request an extension.  Please note that completion of this form does not guarantee that an extension will be granted, just that it will be considered.  You will know that an extension has been granted when the form is returned to you with a new deadline for the assessment, signed by the College Director.

Examples of valid reasons for an extension include confirmed extended periods of illness or recent authorised absence from the college.

 

Unauthorised Late Submission of Work

Late submission up to 14 actual days after the submission date The work will receive a mark up to a maximum of 40%
More than 14 days after the submission date 0%

 

The definition of ‘late’ will be after 9.00 a.m. to Blackboard for electronic copy.

 

Plagiarism and Related Academic Offences

 

Please refer to your programme handbook for specific details regarding plagiarism and bad academic practice.

 

Please be Aware:

 

  • You have been warned in the Module Handbook, and in the Regulations, so explaining that your plagiarism was accidental or that you hadn’t been told it was wrong will not be a valid excuse.
  • Plagiarism is an academic offence. You will be referred to the Academic Practice Officer (APO) if we suspect or find evidence of any of the above offences. There will be a full investigation which will delay the release of your marks.
  • Your assignment will not pass if it contains material which has simply been paraphrased or plagiarised from the learning notes or other electronic or printed material.
  • You must not ‘cut and paste’ or copy from any on-line or any hard copy sources.
  • The use of only the citation or abstract of an article is not acceptable.
  • You may be expelled from the University for an offence of these types
  • Please see the University Guidelines on Plagiarism and Bad Academic Practice for more information on what is acceptable and what is not.

 

 

 

 

 

Mark Scheme (100%)

 

Criteria  Marks
   
Research:

Evidence of research

Good quality sources

Required range of sources

25
Analytical Approach:

Arguments are justified through use of supporting evidence

Evidence is analysed

Appropriate recommendations supported by evidence

 

30

Student Writing & Application:

Use of own words and style of writing; use of quotations is not excessive

Critical approach: stands of evidence are compared, contrasted and questioned

 

25

Structure:

Essay Format

 

There is a sequential logic and clear structure to the assignment

 

10

Referencing:

Correct use of Harvard conventions (in-text citations, reference list, cross-references)

5
General presentation:

Front cover

Spelling, punctuation and grammar

Correct use of paragraphing

Text formatting (line spacing, font size, word count, fully justified text)

5
Total 100

 

Assessors

 

Shelton Giwa and Paresh Lodhia

 

 
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LIPC1140 – Principles of Marketing

LIPC1140 – Principles of Marketing

Time Constrained Assignment (TCA)

**** This assignment is due in today ****

For centuries mankind has been trying to find the secret to eternal youth, the elixir of life. The key to turning off the aging process.  Con-merchants have sold all manner of potions claiming to do just this and in the seventeenth century arsenic was used as make-up and led was dropped into the eyes to make them appear brighter!

You are the marketing team for a cosmetics company which, while working on a new face cream formula in 2000 made a very fortunate mistake and achieved what con-men and scientists have been dreaming of: they accidentally developed a substance which will actually stop the aging process in its tracks.

This breakthrough has been kept quiet for the last eighteen years while the Chief Geneticist used herself as a guinea pig.  She has bathed twice daily in a bath into which the substance is added, much as you would with bubble bath.  Not only does she not look a day older, but at a genetic level she is exactly the same age now as she was eighteen years earlier.  Other than this, the cream has had no ill effects.

The Board is ready to go public with the product in the UK market only, subject only to achieving clearance from various health and safety agencies, which they are certain will happen.

Your task

By 3pm, submit a 2,000-word report for the board to outline the following:

  1. Where do you see your key markets and who would be your main customers?
  2. What pricing strategy should be adopted?
  3. What promotional techniques would you recommend?
  4. Who are your competitors, and which ones will be the most important?
  5. How will the various elements of the marketing environment impact your plans?

In all cases you must explain why you are making your recommendations and justify them fully by using quality academic referencing and marketing theory e.g. PLC, Ansoffs matrix, BCG.

  • Text formatting: – Arial 12, double line spacing.
  • Word limit: – 2000 (+/- 10%) suggested.
 
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University of Bedfordshire Inclusivity of Special Schools and The Impact Essay

Question Description

Can you help me understand this Writing question?

 

type:essay

Length :3000words

main Questions:

what are the advantage and disadvantages of a special school?

Can a special school be inclusive?

Is it fair to separate?

How could a fully realized inclusion affect a mainstream school?

Construction :

1,introduction

2.literature review

3.methodology

4.findings

5.reflection on the research and potential development

Requirements:

1. Demonstrate the following knowledge and understanding

Analyse and critically evaluate the issues of citizenship and welfare in contemporary settings, exploring the philosophical, sociological and political elements that have affected policy, debate and practice.

2. Demonstrate the following skills and abilities

To understand and critically synthesise research from a variety of academic disciplines and backgrounds on citizenship and culture in education.

 
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